E Energy & Mining

Solar Panels Sprang Up in Tehran

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This photo shows solar panel-powered street lights inside a park in north Tehran, on Sunday, 20 May 2018. Mountains of north Tehran soar in the background.

Government-subsidized solar panels on the rooftops of universities, state buildings, parks and other public places provide both needed electricity and a shining symbol of efforts by the Islamic Republic to wean itself off fossil fuels.

With more than 300 sunny days throughout a year, well above the likes of the UK with 150 days of sunlight per year on average, Iran has huge potential to expand solar energy infrastructure.

Iran, home to over 80 million people, is a fossil-fuel powerhouse, even in the crude-oil rich Middle East. It is home to the world's fourth-largest proven oil reserves estimated at 150 billion barrels and the world's second-largest natural gas reserves estimated at approximately 34 trillion cubic meters.

Yet, it has opted to diversify its energy resources and develop other, greener sources of energy.

Although fossil fuel is still supplied to Iranians at subsidized cheap prices, a gradual raise in prices plus a drop in the price of solar panels has made the clean solar more affordable than the past.

Government-subsidized solar panels on the rooftops of universities, state buildings, parks and other public places provide both needed electricity and a shining symbol of efforts by the Islamic Republic to wean itself off fossil fuels. It also speaks of government’s determination to encourage Iranians to embrace solar energy.

According to government officials, authorities have installed solar panels at over 1,000 locations across Iran, including the rooftops of mosques, schools and government buildings to familiarize Iranians with solar energy and demonstrate Iran’s new energy direction.

With more than 300 sunny days throughout a year, well above the likes of the UK with 150 days of sunlight per year on average, Iran has huge potential to expand solar energy infrastructure.

Energy experts believe that there is no bigger and more sustainable energy source than the sun. This is why a large number of countries have been planning, building and investing in large-scale solar plants.

Air pollution, an acute problem for the capital Tehran especially in winter, and water shortage, has also forced city officials to embrace the idea of expanding renewable energy capacity.

Iran is seeking 5,000 megawatts of renewable energy by 2020.

Iran-Europe Business Digest (IEBD) magazine has been launched to facilitate and promote business between Iran and Europe. 

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